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Side view of a Lion walking, Panthera Leo, 10 years old, isolated on white

Leo, the Lost Lion near Tonto Creek

Charles Lindbergh once inadvertently caused a lion roundup in Arizona’s Mazatzal Mountains. In the summer of 1927, MGM Studios hired a stunt pilot to fly Leo, the studio’s trademark lion, on a non-stop flight from Los Angeles to New York…

The Museum Club

A Beer Between the Forked Tree in Flagstaff

FLAGSTAFF — The Museum Club was beset with a diminishing history for years after it opened in 1931. It was first billed as “the biggest log cabin in the world.” Later, it was downsized to “the biggest log cabin in the nation.” But eventually, it became “the biggest log cabin in Arizona.” Regardless of all that, one thing remains constant…

B-1 Bombers in storage at The Boneyard. Photo from Wikipedia.org.

A Graveyard for Winged Warriors in Tucson

TUCSON — Where to old airplanes go to die? The Boneyard. Officially known as the Aerospace Maintenance and Regeneration Center, the Boneyard is a central depot for U.S. military planes that have been taken out of service and put into storage. More than 5,000 of them now sit on 2,600 acres in the desert near Davis-Monthan Air Force Base

Featured: Small Town Scene

nutrioso

How Nutrioso Got Its Name

NUTRIOSO — This Apache County community, located at the south end of Dry Valley, got its name because the Spanish settlers who first arrived in the area disposed of some native wildlife. One was a beaver (“nutria” in Spanish); the other was a bear (“oso” in Spanish).

Salome Frog Mascot

The Story Behind Salome’s Fighting Frogs

SALOME — The Salome High School teams are probably the only athletes in the country nicknamed the Fighting Frogs. It’s a tribute to a legendary frog that never learned how to swim. The non-aquatic amphibian was the brainchild of Dick Wick Hall, a humorist and country philosopher…

Light House Club

Keeping the Riverbanks Lighted in Lake Havasu City

LAKE HAVASU CITY — Although it’s in the desert, many miles from any ocean, Lake Havasu City has something in common with the rocky coastlines of New England and the shores of the American West Coast. They all have lighthouses. The major difference is that those in and around Lake Havasu City are half-scale models.

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Eternal Flickers at Patagonia Shrine

PATAGONIA — Near a small jog in the pavement south of Patagonia, cars pull into a small area where a set of cement stairs leads to a small shrine carved into a large rock. Several candles surround the religious statues inside the grotto. They flicker day and night, illuminating the small space while their smoke turns it a charred black.

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Featured: Dose of History

Sierra Vista

Sierra Vista Gets Namesake from Contest

SIERRA VISTA — Back in 1954, when Sierra Vista was an unnamed community serving nearby Fort Huachuca, the residents decided to incorporate. One of the first steps was selecting a name for the proposed city, so a contest was held.

Skeleton Cave in the Salt River Valley. Courtesy of the US Forest Service.

The Legend of Apache Cave

On Dec. 27, 1872, Army troops trapped a group of Yavapai Apaches who had taken refuge in a cave carved into a hillside located in the Salt River Canyon. The soldiers began firing from below. Upset by the wails of women and children wounded as the bullets ricocheted off the cave’s roof, Maj. William Brown ordered a cease fire so the Indians could surrender. But instead, they began a death chant…

Oraibi Pueblo, circa 1899, is listed on the National Registrar of Historic Places.

Tug-of-War Settles Oraibi Dispute

ORAIBI — This small community on the Hopi Reservation vies with Acoma Pueblo in New Mexico and St. Augustine in Florida for the honor of being the oldest continuously inhabited town in the United States. Unearthed artifacts indicate there have been people living here since about 1150 A.D.

bear

The Bear Facts About Christopher Creek

CHRISTOPHER CREEK — In the early 1880s, Isadore Christopher located his ranch near a small creek in Gila County. One day in July 1882, he killed a bear, skinned it and hung the carcass in one of the two cabins he had erected. The next day, he left his ranch (and the bear) and went back into the surrounding forest.

nutrioso

How Nutrioso Got Its Name

NUTRIOSO — This Apache County community, located at the south end of Dry Valley, got its name because the Spanish settlers who first arrived in the area disposed of some native wildlife. One was a beaver (“nutria” in Spanish); the other was a bear (“oso” in Spanish).

Wild West Gun Revolver

The Blunder at Slinkard Springs in Pinal County

Somewhere back in the hills of Pinal County, where mining once flourished and claim jumpers and robbers made a decent living, there’s a place called Slinkard Springs. The exact location has been pretty much obscured by time and development, but the story behind its name remains intact.

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