Featured

Latest News

The old Santa Claus village is up for sale. Photo by Marshall Shore.

Santa Claus, Ariz. is Up for Sale

Ever wanted to own a ghost town? Now you can! Santa Claus – a modern Arizona ghost town – is up for sale. Santa Claus is located about 14 miles northwest of Kingman along U.S. Route 93. The Santa-theme village opened in the late 1930s and businesses operated here until 1995.

Arizona State Flag

Arizona History Trivia 6: Can You Pass?

Test your knowledge of Arizona history with this short quiz, originally published in Marshall Trimble’s Official Arizona Trivia. Don’t scroll down too quickly. The answers are posted shortly below the questions. When you’re finished, leave a comment with your score.

Hubbell Trading Post

Hubbell Trading Post Offers Glimpse Into Past

GANADO – Opening the door to the Hubbell Trading Post is like opening a door into the past. With the sound of the creaky floors and exquisite Navajo rugs hung along the wall, it truly feels like you’re stepping back in time. You may also find women weaving those rugs, so beautiful they are considered art.

Featured: Small Town Scene

World's Largest Petrified Tree in Holbrook

World’s Largest Petrified Tree in Holbrook

JOSEPH CITY — The folks at Geronimo Indian Store don’t have to worry about anybody walking off with their prize attraction because most people aren’t capable of picking up a 45-ton piece of petrified wood. Even if they had a crane or a bulldozer, that chunk of rock ain’t going no place.

Wigman Motel in Holbook, Arizona

Stay in a Tepee in Holbrook

HOLBROOK — The Wigwam Motel is where memories are born and people from all over the world still carry them around. The motel has 15 units, each shaped like a tepee. It was built by Chester Lewis in 1950 and each unit still has its original furniture, including two full-sized beds, plus a television set capable of receiving at least 50 channels.

nutrioso

How Nutrioso Got Its Name

NUTRIOSO — This Apache County community, located at the south end of Dry Valley, got its name because the Spanish settlers who first arrived in the area disposed of some native wildlife. One was a beaver (“nutria” in Spanish); the other was a bear (“oso” in Spanish).

Salome Frog Mascot

The Story Behind Salome’s Fighting Frogs

SALOME — The Salome High School teams are probably the only athletes in the country nicknamed the Fighting Frogs. It’s a tribute to a legendary frog that never learned how to swim. The non-aquatic amphibian was the brainchild of Dick Wick Hall, a humorist and country philosopher…

More Posts from this Category

Featured: Dose of History

The old Santa Claus village is up for sale. Photo by Marshall Shore.

Santa Claus, Ariz. is Up for Sale

Ever wanted to own a ghost town? Now you can! Santa Claus – a modern Arizona ghost town – is up for sale. Santa Claus is located about 14 miles northwest of Kingman along U.S. Route 93. The Santa-theme village opened in the late 1930s and businesses operated here until 1995.

Arizona State Flag

Arizona History Trivia 6: Can You Pass?

Test your knowledge of Arizona history with this short quiz, originally published in Marshall Trimble’s Official Arizona Trivia. Don’t scroll down too quickly. The answers are posted shortly below the questions. When you’re finished, leave a comment with your score.

Hubbell Trading Post

Hubbell Trading Post Offers Glimpse Into Past

GANADO – Opening the door to the Hubbell Trading Post is like opening a door into the past. With the sound of the creaky floors and exquisite Navajo rugs hung along the wall, it truly feels like you’re stepping back in time. You may also find women weaving those rugs, so beautiful they are considered art.

Sierra Vista

Sierra Vista Gets Namesake from Contest

SIERRA VISTA — Back in 1954, when Sierra Vista was an unnamed community serving nearby Fort Huachuca, the residents decided to incorporate. One of the first steps was selecting a name for the proposed city, so a contest was held.

Skeleton Cave in the Salt River Valley. Courtesy of the US Forest Service.

The Legend of Apache Cave

On Dec. 27, 1872, Army troops trapped a group of Yavapai Apaches who had taken refuge in a cave carved into a hillside located in the Salt River Canyon. The soldiers began firing from below. Upset by the wails of women and children wounded as the bullets ricocheted off the cave’s roof, Maj. William Brown ordered a cease fire so the Indians could surrender. But instead, they began a death chant…

More Posts from this Category