• 4035
    3

    Back in 1850, when the New Mexico territory was cre­ated, the wild, untamed western portion that would become Arizona was sparsely populated by non-Indians. The only white community was Tucson. Word quickly trickled back east about the vast mineral riches. "If ya stumble on a rock, don't cuss it—cash it" or, "If ya wash yer ...
  • 3189
    0

    Somewhere out in these rugged mountains, just maybe, lies the greatest lost mine of 'em all, The Lost Adams. According to legend a sheer canyon wall with a huge boulder at the base hides a narrow opening into a Z-shaped canyon, called by the Apaches, Sno-ta-hay. This hidden canyon opens up into a small valley with ...
  • 14694
    7

    Q: I have an 1891 map that shows an area in northeastern Arizona as “Diamond Fields.” Have diamonds been found in this area, and if so, are diamonds mined there now? A: This turned out to be pretty interesting. There is indeed a wide spot on the road near the junction of U.S. 160 and Arizona ...
  • 5084
    2

    According to those who search for buried treasure in Arizona, there's a fortune hidden beneath the floors of Tumacacori, the old mission near Tubac. The legends say that the church was once not only a place of worship, but also a mill and smelter for a gold and silver mining operation run by Jesuit missionaries ...
  • 2259
    0

    Today's disreputable land promoters selling lake shore lots on edges of mirages are mere amateurs when compared to the wheeler dealers of yesteryear. The lawless Arizona territory attracted the wide gamut of frontier con men ranging from tin horn gamblers to stock swindlers. One was Doctor Richard Flower. Doc Flower wasn’t really a doctor. He ...